Missing Link
Listening and Painting

Justine and I finished the book “Little House on the Prairie” last night before bed. It’s been a fascinating read as an adult to my child, not least because I remember my father reading those books to me as a young girl. But I also have enjoyed the history lesson, one I can maybe appreciate more as a grown-up. On more than one occasion, I’ve mentioned Laura Ingall’s list of chores  while trying to get Justine to simply set the table. “She helped her father build a house!” Those pioneer’s were tough folks, but they carried on to make what they thought would be a better life for their families. America has changed so much since then, so it’s been interesting to visit our history, especially (in Justine’s case) to have it told by a girl.

For the past couple of weeks, I’ve been delving more into my own heritage of strong American women that made a difference for themselves and others, that paved the way for the freedoms we have now. This may be the closest I ever get to homeschooling, but I’ve invited Justine into the project, introducing her to some of the foremothers I admired when I was young. Their legacy can inspire both of us.

I started with Eleanor Roosevelt…

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Susan B. Anthony

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Amelia Earhart

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Rosa Parks

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Bessie Coleman

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Helen Keller

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We have so much to learn from those who came before. And so much to be thankful to them for.

 

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Missing Link
Listening and Painting